Technology is just atool. Teaching is themost importanteducational resource(Cohen, Fuhrman &Mosher, 2007).There needs to be areculturing andteachers need todesign curriculumfocused on deepunderstanding(Fullan, 2007).From this standpointthe fundamental task ofeducation is toenculturate youth intothis knowledge-creatingcivilization and to helpthem find a place in it(Scardamelia &Bereiter, 2006).Rather than viewingleadership practice as aproduct of a leader'sknowledge and skill, thedistributed perspectivedefines it as theinteractions betweenpeople and their situation”(Spillane, 2005).Sergiovanni (2001)states that leaders mustconcentrate on peoplefirst, build them up,increase theircommitment, link themto purposes, and helpthem to be self-managing.“Meaning cannot betaught; it must befashioned by thelearner via artfuldesign and effectivecoaching by theteacher” (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).NewBeliefsKnowledge isinformation on tap;skills are routineperformances on tap;understanding is theability to think and actflexibly with what oneknows (Wiske, 2005).A primary goal ofeducation should bethe development anddeepening of studentunderstanding(Wiggins & McTighe,1998)Studies show sharpdisparities by raceand SES in howtechnologies weredeployed foreducation (Becker,2000; Wenglinsky,1998).Meaning cannot betaught; it must befashioned by thelearner via artfuldesign and effectivecoaching by theteacher” (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).SupportingChangeReform cannothappen unlesseach and everyteacher is learningevery day (Fullan,2007).The preparation andcontinuing professionaldevelopment of educatorsis a major element that isrequired for schooltransformation andappropriate use oftechnology resources(Schrum & Strudler,2011).Teachers aredesigners andteachers need towork with a clearinsight into largerpurposes (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).Transformation requires cleargoals about what digital mediain schools can achieve; theappropriate curricula,pedagogy, and assessment toreach these goals; and theright social and technicalinfrastructure to support theendeavor (Warschauer, 2“Teaching should behighly customized”and “teachers areviewed as facilitatingstudent constructionof knowledge”(Wenglinsky, 2005).“Core tasks with authenticchallenges embody oureducational aims: Thegoal of schooling is fluentand effectiveperformance in the world,not mere verbal orphysical response tonarrow prompts” (Wiggins& McTighe, 2005).The key is not technologyitself but...(1)a curriculumfocused on deepunderstanding (2)a pedagogy[that] promotes student-centered learning,(3)classroom assessments thatare both performative andformative (Warschauer, 2011).For widespread changeto occur, teachers need toincorporate theopportunities of theemerging technologicalinfrastructure into theiroverall curricular thinking(Darling-Hammond &Bransford, 2005)."Educationalchange dependson what teachersdo and think-- it'sas simple and ascomplex as that"(Fullan, 2007).NewTeachingApproachEducation [is not]addressing the needs ofthe 21st century. It is 20thcentury, industrial ageeducation superchargedby high-stakes testingand high-tech tools fordoing 1920’s types ofchild-centered education”(Scardamalia, 2001).Today the digital divideresides in differentialability to use new media...—in essence, to carry outthe kinds of expertthinking and complexcommunication that are atthe heart of the neweconomy (Warschauer &Matuchniak, 2010).Technology is just atool. Teaching is themost importanteducational resource(Cohen, Fuhrman &Mosher, 2007).There needs to be areculturing andteachers need todesign curriculumfocused on deepunderstanding(Fullan, 2007).From this standpointthe fundamental task ofeducation is toenculturate youth intothis knowledge-creatingcivilization and to helpthem find a place in it(Scardamelia &Bereiter, 2006).Rather than viewingleadership practice as aproduct of a leader'sknowledge and skill, thedistributed perspectivedefines it as theinteractions betweenpeople and their situation”(Spillane, 2005).Sergiovanni (2001)states that leaders mustconcentrate on peoplefirst, build them up,increase theircommitment, link themto purposes, and helpthem to be self-managing.“Meaning cannot betaught; it must befashioned by thelearner via artfuldesign and effectivecoaching by theteacher” (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).NewBeliefsKnowledge isinformation on tap;skills are routineperformances on tap;understanding is theability to think and actflexibly with what oneknows (Wiske, 2005).A primary goal ofeducation should bethe development anddeepening of studentunderstanding(Wiggins & McTighe,1998)Studies show sharpdisparities by raceand SES in howtechnologies weredeployed foreducation (Becker,2000; Wenglinsky,1998).Meaning cannot betaught; it must befashioned by thelearner via artfuldesign and effectivecoaching by theteacher” (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).SupportingChangeReform cannothappen unlesseach and everyteacher is learningevery day (Fullan,2007).The preparation andcontinuing professionaldevelopment of educatorsis a major element that isrequired for schooltransformation andappropriate use oftechnology resources(Schrum & Strudler,2011).Teachers aredesigners andteachers need towork with a clearinsight into largerpurposes (Wiggins &McTighe, 2005).Transformation requires cleargoals about what digital mediain schools can achieve; theappropriate curricula,pedagogy, and assessment toreach these goals; and theright social and technicalinfrastructure to support theendeavor (Warschauer, 2“Teaching should behighly customized”and “teachers areviewed as facilitatingstudent constructionof knowledge”(Wenglinsky, 2005).“Core tasks with authenticchallenges embody oureducational aims: Thegoal of schooling is fluentand effectiveperformance in the world,not mere verbal orphysical response tonarrow prompts” (Wiggins& McTighe, 2005).The key is not technologyitself but...(1)a curriculumfocused on deepunderstanding (2)a pedagogy[that] promotes student-centered learning,(3)classroom assessments thatare both performative andformative (Warschauer, 2011).For widespread changeto occur, teachers need toincorporate theopportunities of theemerging technologicalinfrastructure into theiroverall curricular thinking(Darling-Hammond &Bransford, 2005)."Educationalchange dependson what teachersdo and think-- it'sas simple and ascomplex as that"(Fullan, 2007).NewTeachingApproachEducation [is not]addressing the needs ofthe 21st century. It is 20thcentury, industrial ageeducation superchargedby high-stakes testingand high-tech tools fordoing 1920’s types ofchild-centered education”(Scardamalia, 2001).Today the digital divideresides in differentialability to use new media...—in essence, to carry outthe kinds of expertthinking and complexcommunication that are atthe heart of the neweconomy (Warschauer &Matuchniak, 2010).