“As regarded theshipmaster,however, all waslooked upon aspertaining to thecharacter, as to afish his glisteningscales.” (209)“And willthe ministerbe there?”(205).“The dress,soproper..to..Pearl,seemed aneffluence,or inevitabledevelopment..manifestation ofher character,no more to beseparated from her than themany-hued brilliancy from abutterfly’s wing,or the paintedglory from the leaf of a brightfl“Pearl was decked outwith airy gayety...Thedress, so proper was itto little Pearl, seemedan effluence, orinevitable developmentand outwardmanifestation of hercharacter…” (204).“..Indians in their savage fineryof curiously embroidereddeerskin robes, wampum-belts, red and yellow ochre,and feathers, and armed withthe bow and arrow and stone-headed spear stood apart,with countenances of inflexiblegravity...” (208).“On this publicholiday, as on allother occasions, forseven years past,Hester was clad in agarment of coarsegray cloth.” (203)“The picture of humanlife in the marketplace,though its general tintwas the sad graw,brown, or black of theEnglish emigrants, wasyer enlivened by somediversity of hue.” (208)“They wait to see theprocession pass...For theGovernor and themagistrates are to go by,and the ministers, and allthe great people andgood people, with themusic, and the soldiersmarching before them,”(205).“But, at that instant,she beheld old RogerChillingworth himself,standing in theremotest corner of themarketplace, andsmiling at her...” (211)“...HesterPrynne andlittle Pearl cameinto themarketplace.”(202)“...a small vacant area - asort of magic circle - hadformed itself about her,into which, though thepeople were elbowingone another at a littledistance, none ventured,or felt disposed, tointrude.” (210)“Roger Chillingworth,the physician, was seento enter the market-place, in close andfamiliar talk with thecommander of thequestionable vessel.”(209)“I must bid the stewardmake ready one moreberth than youbargained for...that thisphysician here—Chillingworth, he callshimself—is minded totry my cabin-fare withyou,” (210).“But he will notgreet thee to-day; nor mustthou greethim,” (205).“They transgressed,withoutfear or scruple,the rules ofbehaviour that were bindingon all others;smoking tobaccounder..beadle’s..nose..quaffing,at theirpleasure,draughts of wine oraqua-vitae from pocket-flasks,which they..tendered tothe gap“And will he holdout both his handsto me, as whenthou ledst me tohim from thebrookside?” (205).“He washed his sootyface, and put on hisSabbath-day clothes,and looks as if he wouldgladly be merry, if anykind body would onlyteach him how!” (205)“...after sustaining thegaze of the multitudethrough sevenmiserable years as anecessity, a penance,and something which itwas stern religion toendure...” (203)“They knoweach other well,indeed. Theyhave long dwelttogether.” (210)“...a smile which -across the wide andbustling square, andthrough all the talk andlaughter, and variousthoughts, moods, andinterests of the crowd-conveyed secret andfearful meaning.” (211)“Heremembersthee a littlebabe, mychild.” (205)“They were rough-lookingdesperadoes,with sun-blackened faces..immensity ofbeard..short trousers..confinedabout..waist by belts..claspedwith a..plate ofgold..sustaining..asword...beneath their broad-brimmed hats of palm-leaf,gleamed eyes whThe NewEnglandHoliday“In the dark of night-timehe calls us to him, andholds thy hand and mine,as when we stood thescaffold yonder... Buthere, in the sunny day,among all the people, heknows us not; nor mustwe know him!” (205)“As regarded theshipmaster,however, all waslooked upon aspertaining to thecharacter, as to afish his glisteningscales.” (209)“And willthe ministerbe there?”(205).“The dress,soproper..to..Pearl,seemed aneffluence,or inevitabledevelopment..manifestation ofher character,no more to beseparated from her than themany-hued brilliancy from abutterfly’s wing,or the paintedglory from the leaf of a brightfl“Pearl was decked outwith airy gayety...Thedress, so proper was itto little Pearl, seemedan effluence, orinevitable developmentand outwardmanifestation of hercharacter…” (204).“..Indians in their savage fineryof curiously embroidereddeerskin robes, wampum-belts, red and yellow ochre,and feathers, and armed withthe bow and arrow and stone-headed spear stood apart,with countenances of inflexiblegravity...” (208).“On this publicholiday, as on allother occasions, forseven years past,Hester was clad in agarment of coarsegray cloth.” (203)“The picture of humanlife in the marketplace,though its general tintwas the sad graw,brown, or black of theEnglish emigrants, wasyer enlivened by somediversity of hue.” (208)“They wait to see theprocession pass...For theGovernor and themagistrates are to go by,and the ministers, and allthe great people andgood people, with themusic, and the soldiersmarching before them,”(205).“But, at that instant,she beheld old RogerChillingworth himself,standing in theremotest corner of themarketplace, andsmiling at her...” (211)“...HesterPrynne andlittle Pearl cameinto themarketplace.”(202)“...a small vacant area - asort of magic circle - hadformed itself about her,into which, though thepeople were elbowingone another at a littledistance, none ventured,or felt disposed, tointrude.” (210)“Roger Chillingworth,the physician, was seento enter the market-place, in close andfamiliar talk with thecommander of thequestionable vessel.”(209)“I must bid the stewardmake ready one moreberth than youbargained for...that thisphysician here—Chillingworth, he callshimself—is minded totry my cabin-fare withyou,” (210).“But he will notgreet thee to-day; nor mustthou greethim,” (205).“They transgressed,withoutfear or scruple,the rules ofbehaviour that were bindingon all others;smoking tobaccounder..beadle’s..nose..quaffing,at theirpleasure,draughts of wine oraqua-vitae from pocket-flasks,which they..tendered tothe gap“And will he holdout both his handsto me, as whenthou ledst me tohim from thebrookside?” (205).“He washed his sootyface, and put on hisSabbath-day clothes,and looks as if he wouldgladly be merry, if anykind body would onlyteach him how!” (205)“...after sustaining thegaze of the multitudethrough sevenmiserable years as anecessity, a penance,and something which itwas stern religion toendure...” (203)“They knoweach other well,indeed. Theyhave long dwelttogether.” (210)“...a smile which -across the wide andbustling square, andthrough all the talk andlaughter, and variousthoughts, moods, andinterests of the crowd-conveyed secret andfearful meaning.” (211)“Heremembersthee a littlebabe, mychild.” (205)“They were rough-lookingdesperadoes,with sun-blackened faces..immensity ofbeard..short trousers..confinedabout..waist by belts..claspedwith a..plate ofgold..sustaining..asword...beneath their broad-brimmed hats of palm-leaf,gleamed eyes whThe NewEnglandHoliday“In the dark of night-timehe calls us to him, andholds thy hand and mine,as when we stood thescaffold yonder... Buthere, in the sunny day,among all the people, heknows us not; nor mustwe know him!” (205)

Chapter 21 Bingo - Call List

(Print) Use this randomly generated list as your call list when playing the game. There is no need to say the BINGO column name. Place some kind of mark (like an X, a checkmark, a dot, tally mark, etc) on each cell as you announce it, to keep track. You can also cut out each item, place them in a bag and pull words from the bag.


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  1. “As regarded the shipmaster, however, all was looked upon as pertaining to the character, as to a fish his glistening scales.” (209)
  2. “And will the minister be there?” (205).
  3. “The dress,so proper..to..Pearl,seemed an effluence,or inevitable development..manifestation of her character,no more to be separated from her than the many-hued brilliancy from a butterfly’s wing,or the painted glory from the leaf of a bright fl
  4. “Pearl was decked out with airy gayety...The dress, so proper was it to little Pearl, seemed an effluence, or inevitable development and outward manifestation of her character…” (204).
  5. “..Indians in their savage finery of curiously embroidered deerskin robes, wampum-belts, red and yellow ochre, and feathers, and armed with the bow and arrow and stone-headed spear stood apart, with countenances of inflexible gravity...” (208).
  6. “On this public holiday, as on all other occasions, for seven years past, Hester was clad in a garment of coarse gray cloth.” (203)
  7. “The picture of human life in the marketplace, though its general tint was the sad graw, brown, or black of the English emigrants, was yer enlivened by some diversity of hue.” (208)
  8. “They wait to see the procession pass...For the Governor and the magistrates are to go by, and the ministers, and all the great people and good people, with the music, and the soldiers marching before them,” (205).
  9. “But, at that instant, she beheld old Roger Chillingworth himself, standing in the remotest corner of the marketplace, and smiling at her...” (211)
  10. “...Hester Prynne and little Pearl came into the marketplace.” (202)
  11. “...a small vacant area - a sort of magic circle - had formed itself about her, into which, though the people were elbowing one another at a little distance, none ventured, or felt disposed, to intrude.” (210)
  12. “Roger Chillingworth, the physician, was seen to enter the market-place, in close and familiar talk with the commander of the questionable vessel.” (209)
  13. “I must bid the steward make ready one more berth than you bargained for...that this physician here—Chillingworth, he calls himself—is minded to try my cabin-fare with you,” (210).
  14. “But he will not greet thee to-day; nor must thou greet him,” (205).
  15. “They transgressed,without fear or scruple,the rules of behaviour that were binding on all others;smoking tobacco under..beadle’s.. nose..quaffing,at their pleasure,draughts of wine or aqua-vitae from pocket-flasks,which they..tendered to the gap
  16. “And will he hold out both his hands to me, as when thou ledst me to him from the brookside?” (205).
  17. “He washed his sooty face, and put on his Sabbath-day clothes, and looks as if he would gladly be merry, if any kind body would only teach him how!” (205)
  18. “...after sustaining the gaze of the multitude through seven miserable years as a necessity, a penance, and something which it was stern religion to endure...” (203)
  19. “They know each other well, indeed. They have long dwelt together.” (210)
  20. “...a smile which - across the wide and bustling square, and through all the talk and laughter, and various thoughts, moods, and interests of the crowd- conveyed secret and fearful meaning.” (211)
  21. “He remembers thee a little babe, my child.” (205)
  22. “They were rough-looking desperadoes,with sun-blackened faces..immensity of beard..short trousers..confined about..waist by belts..clasped with a..plate of gold..sustaining..a sword...beneath their broad-brimmed hats of palm-leaf, gleamed eyes wh
  23. The New England Holiday
  24. “In the dark of night-time he calls us to him, and holds thy hand and mine, as when we stood the scaffold yonder... But here, in the sunny day, among all the people, he knows us not; nor must we know him!” (205)